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Intellect >> Assess Your Stress Risk
 

Assess Your Stress Risk


Studies have revealed that some personality traits are more susceptible to high levels of stress than others – these belong to the Type A personalities. This group of people are relatively easy to recognize: they are extremely competitive, set tight deadlines for themselves and continually to strive to get ahead – even if the goal is nothing more significant tat reaching the top of the queue faster than others.

Type A personnel need to be praised and reassured and can e aggressive if things do not go according to plan. They talk a lot, particularly about themselves, and do not listen to others. They babble about their lives looking tense, giving off ‘I am stressed’ messages for all to read.

Type B people are at the other side of the scale. They are self-assured, relaxed and pleasant to be with. They are just as motivated as Type A people and get on with a job in an efficient, calm manner. They often reach the same end point as the Type A, but without the frantic, aggressive and harassed approach. Type Bs tend to wait patiently for attention, are excellent listeners and are rarely offensive in their behaviour.

Type B people achieve similar goals as do Type A people but display fewer anxiety signals and are far less stressed. This can be explained by the fact that Type A people are being driven from within. They often create their own pressures, since they feel they must always be in control and strive to be perfect. When they make mistakes, they will look for scapegoat to blame, whereas Type B personalities are contend to meander along in life and do not feel driven in the same manner. .

 

Psychologists who have studied personality types have classified 3 categories of people: The “I Want To” personality type is strongly motivated and will strive hard for the extra status, financial gain and praise that he believes are his rewards for working more intensely than other people. This type of people uses the adrenaline boost positively. After he has been successful, he will usually relax as the demands subside. There is no problem with this style of behaviour provided t hat he does not remain on a continual high and treats his body well after the event. This is the proper way to use the short-term energy levels that get the work done.

The “I Have To” person also places a high demand on his energy levels, but pushes himself for longer periods of time and is driven by a sense that he “must” complete the job, rather than “wanting” to complete the job. Adrenaline provides the temporary boost, but as this is depleted he begins to falter and signs of stress starts to surface as he fails to slow down and relax. Hormones are released that break down fat from the body and convert sugars to glucose to provide immediate energy. These fats and sugars float in the blood stream, and if they are not burned off, they will clog the artery walls, giving rise to high blood pressure and coronary disease. People with this personality trait should exercise regularly to burn off their excess fats and sugars and master some relaxation techniques.

The “I Cannot Escape From” person is permanently in a position in which he demands vast quantities of energy to deal with perceived, inescapable pressures. His body is asked to provide energy faster than he can supply it, leaving him in a state of constant exhaustion. The whole system – physical, mental and emotional – rapidly spirals out of control. Modification of personality types and traits can be achieved if a person with an aggressive, forceful personality tries to model his behaviour on the personality of a less aggressive friend. Selection of a suitable role model should be done slowly, over a period of time, not in the typically harassed manner.


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